The NCRI Brain Group’s “Brain Tumour Research Review” Working Group sets out to achieve Priority 1 of the NCRI Brain Group Strategic Priorities: To produce and publish a position paper on the challenges faced in brain tumour research and proposed solutions, including a summary of the achievements from the previous 5-year strategy.

By addressing this priority, this working group aims to establish a joint consensus on the future of brain cancer research across the UK, with a focus on collaboration as opposed to competition. Greater collaboration will ultimately result in higher quality multi-centre studies.

The position paper will focus on ensuring that PPI, core outcome measures and neuroimaging are embedded within all studies from inception to delivery.

You can see the full list of strategic priorities for the NCRI Brain Group here. 

If you are interested in becoming a member of this working group, visit the jobs and opportunities page to apply to become a general member.

Working Group Members

Professor Oliver Hanemann

Chair

Professor Oliver Hanemann is a clinical academic and has led the Brain ...

Professor Oliver Hanemann

Chair

Professor Oliver Hanemann is a clinical academic and has led the Brain Tumour Research Centre of Excellence funded by Brain Tumour Research in Plymouth for many years. Professor Hanemann has a long track record in Neuro-oncology including many fruitful collaborations, such as part of the ICOM or REiNS consortium.  

As a member of the scientific board of EANO and WFNOS and in grant review panels (e.g. Brain Research UK), Professor Hanemann has an insight into challenges faced in brain tumour research. 

Dr Ross Carruthers

Deputy Chair

Dr Ross Carruthers

Deputy Chair

Dr Ross Carruthers has been a Consultant Radiation Neuro-oncologist at the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre since 2017 and is a CRUK Clinician Scientist at the University of Glasgow.

His laboratory research group investigates the role of DNA damage response in glioma stem cells, with a particular focus on targeting DNA replication stress as a way of sensitising glioblastoma to radiotherapy. The group use primary cell lines and in vivo GBM models with cutting edge techniques to investigate DNA replication and DNA damage response in order to better understand the unique replication phenotype in glioma stem cells. The group aim to translate this approach into the clinic for patient benefit.

Dr Karin Purshouse

Early Career Researcher (ECR) Lead

Dr Karin Purshouse

Early Career Researcher (ECR) Lead

Dr Karin Purshouse is an ECAT Clinical Lecturer and Honorary Registrar in Medical Oncology in Edinburgh. She is currently a PhD student studying extrachromosomal DNA in glioblastoma at the University of Edinburgh, and her interests include translational research and clinical trials.